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Medicine Personal Statement

When I was a child, I always dreamt of a career in the Humanities. I loved languages and Literature. As I grew up and began studying subjects in more depth, this love became overshadowed by my love for the sciences. I was fascinated by the amount of information that could be acquired, by how much humans could learn about themselves.

The only thing I found more intriguing than this information, was what could be done with it. There was clearly a beauty in being able to use acquired knowledge to save a life or ease somebody's pain. Slowly, a career in Medicine began to appeal to me and as the years went by, it became the only career I could consider.

Having six younger siblings helped me on my way to early maturity, vigilance and becoming a caring person. I had many duties and was looked upon to shoulder a great amount of responsibility. I always made sure I performed to the best of my abilities. This led me to be given many responsibilities at school too. I was crowned Exemplary Pupil from the year 2000 to 2005 and was also made a prefect.

I also translated articles for the school magazine and helped out with the school elections. I had to learn how to juggle all this with my GCSE's too. At the time of my GCSE's, I was living in Saudi Arabia and the school I attended was Arabic Medium. This meant that the only way I was able to do my GCSE's was by doing them at home with little help. It taught me how to be an independent student and gave me an in depth education in two languages up to secondary level.

While I was still living in Saudi Arabia, I looked for a way to understand being a doctor and caring for others as much as possible. I was very grateful to be allowed to shadow a team of neurosurgeons at The National Guard Hospital. For the first time, I saw real life medicine. It was brought to my attention how accurate and observant doctors must be.

Being a doctor was a combination of being professional, compassionate and diligent, while never forgetting to smile and offer patients words of support, no matter how promising or hopeless the situation seems. My attraction to the profession increased. I was also allowed to observe a surgical procedure, the insertion of a VP shunt into a baby with Hydrocephalus. The procedure was quite short, but I left in wonder and wishing for more.

During the summer, I began volunteering with Birmingham Focus on Blindness for ten hours a week, where the majority of service users suffer from multiple disabilities. Every day I spend in the organization, I learn so much about caring for those who need it.

The self-gratification I feel every time I am able to assist a service user is one of the strongest emotions I've experienced. I plan to spend my gap year as productively as possible. I am preparing to spend at least a month in Ghana, assisting in an orphanage. I hope this will allow me to be a positive impact in the lives of the children there.

On my return, I will continue helping at Birmingham Focus on Blindness and intend to get a job at a care home, where I hope to gain further insight into the healthcare system. I also plan to use my gap year to explore my current hobbies, cooking, exercising and novel writing in more depth and hope to take on new challenges, which include skydiving and learning British Sign Language.

Being a career which combines scientific knowledge with care work, I see Medicine as the way to live my life to the fullest, doing the things I love best. I feel that I will be an efficient doctor and hope that I will bring much happiness to my future patients. I hope to make an impact on the world, by making a positive impact on as many lives as possible and offering all I have.

Description: 
This personal statement recently got me an interview (and an offer) from Peninsula Medical School, despite pretty poor GCSE grades. I really hope it helps.
Year applied: 
2009
Subject: 
Medicine

Comments

I like your intro. It's very

I like your intro. It's very original.

Not very good

You did a bit of listing but not too much. The problem again is lack of in depth explanation of your activities and what YOU GAINED from it. GCSEs are not really relevant with Peninsula so your interview, A-levels and school reference is what got you in. The PS is average I would say

GCSE's and A-levels

WHat were your GCSE's and AS-results?

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