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Medicine Personal Statement

My interest in studying medicine stemmed from a deep curiosity about the human body and a wish to work with people.

As I researched what was involved in being a doctor, I realised that this was what I really wanted to do. Attending a medical careers conference at Methodist College in Belfast and work experience confirmed my desire to become a doctor.

To further my insight into a career in medicine I spent a week at a health centre. Sitting in on a GP's surgery demonstrated how family doctors integrate with the community and deal with all aspects of patient health. During consultation with a bereaved patient I was able to appreciate the intimacy of the doctor-patient relationship.

Afternoons with midwives, health visitors and treatment nurses at the health centre showed me how community doctors work in a team with other health professionals. The GP I shadowed also worked in endoscopy and allowed me to observe procedures. I was interested to learn in a more applied way than from textbook. After this work experience, I tried to gain caring experience at a hospital and two care homes. All told me that accepting volunteers under the age of 18 was against policy.

Wanting to learn more about hospital medicine, I spent a week in a cardiology unit. I was amazed by the effect seemingly simple procedures such as coronary angiograms and stent insertions had on patient quality of life. In the cardiology follow-up clinic I noted how consultants need diplomacy and patience to sidestep complaints irrelevant to their specialty.

I gained an insight into junior doctors' duties by shadowing two for a day. I learned about heart problems watching clinical physiologists run exercise stress tests and at the nurse-led Chest Pain clinic. I also shadowed a surgeon specialising in hepatobiliary disease in the Republic of Ireland. In theatre I witnessed laparoscopic cholecystectomies, a partial hepatectomy and a Whipple's procedure. I saw the same patients recovering at rounds at 7am each morning, where I observed the respective roles of the consultant, registrar, SHO, JHO and ward nurses.

Last year I volunteered with Marie Curie Cancer Care every Friday, sorting and sterilising donations to their shop. The charity funds cancer research and provides palliative care.

My Saturday job in a pharmacy has given me experience working with the public. My duties include delivering medication to seriously ill people (enabling me to see the role of community care) and dealing with a few difficult customers, requiring patience and good communication skills. I have applied for a further part-time job as a medical laboratory assistant in a hospital.

I am an avid reader. Apart from fiction, I enjoy popular-science books by Richard Dawkins, Oliver Sacks and Michio Kaku. I keep up with news in science and medicine by reading New Scientist and the Student BMJ. As a politics student I must stay informed on current issues, helping me to develop the skills necessary for life-long learning - a vital part of being a doctor.

I have a passion for music: I can play piano and am teaching myself guitar. I am also learning to speak Italian and preparing for my driving test. I ran in the 2005 and 2007 Belfast Marathons to raise money for charity and have surfed at national level, improving my fitness and stamina.

I am a certified First Aider. Being the eldest of six has given me lots of experience with children. With two classmates, I wrote and directed a play for younger students, requiring creativity, teamwork and commitment.

As a school prefect I worked with pupils adjusting to their new school. I was chosen to take part in ACCESS, which focussed on teambuilding across a culture divide. I am confident and articulate, participating in the International Soroptimist Public Speaking competition. My work experience afforded me a glimpse into many health professions, but I am certain of my choice of career. I am intent on studying medicine either as an undergraduate or a graduate.

Description: 
This personal statement got me interviews from the University of East Anglia, Leeds, Aberdeen and Peninsula Medical School - and offers from the latter three. It's not Dostoevsky, but it doesn't have to be: it's about packing in as much relevant information as possible. Oh, and get as much work experience as you possibly can.
Year applied: 
2008
Subject: 
Medicine

Comments

*tsk* *tsk* cant believe you

*tsk* *tsk* cant believe you stole other people's ideas and still got in...very dissappointed rafe

where did you apply with your

where did you apply with your personal statement and if you dont mind me asking where did you receive offers from?

oh sorry found it. didnt look

oh sorry found it. didnt look properly the first time!

Have you done the BMAT and

Have you done the BMAT and UKCAT?
How was it?

How do you register for BMAT?

Gosh, you've done so much in

Gosh, you've done so much in such a short space of time. Well done. :D

guest

brill and very helpful ps. thank you for making this public and helping others lyk me in sellin themsevels b2r to uni's.

Just a question

How did you go about getting all the work experience you did? I'm applying for medicine, but haven't got a clue about how to get the necessary work experience.

Getting Work Experience

I was really lucky in that my GP was happy to let me shadow her. Hospital stuff can be trickier: a lot of them (including mine) don't want sixth-formers in, but if you're prepared to ring/email round every hospital you can possibly get to, you should find plenty of consultants who can't wait to have students along.

There are companies that can arrange it for you as well and you can generally get in touch with them through careers teachers, if not directly.

BUUhwUtPWL

A big thank you for your blog. Great.

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