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Medicine Personal Statement

Failing to secure a place in medical school at 18 created a seed of uncertainty and self-doubt in my mind. It made me question my childhood dream and I asked myself, why do I want to study medicine? Is it because of money? Is it to boost my public image?.

And then the answer hit me like a bullet, I did not choose medicine for the money or the fame but I chose it because I made a promise after a visit to my homeland, Somalia, that I would choose a path where I can be a great influence in someone's life by helping them physically and emotionally. I could not think of any other career that would enable me to do this at a whole new level except medicine.

That visit to Somalia changed my way of thinking and I am glad, because seeing less fortunate people around me who had no income to provide themselves with good healthcare, made me feel a pain in my heart that I never felt before.

This pain made me more determined than ever to try to better the lives of human beings around the world and I admire doctors because I believe that they are the richest people in the world, in the sense that, they do something that is very fulfilling and it seems that nothing else would make them as happy. It would be a great honour for me to be a part of this phenomenon.

To further solidify my decision to study medicine, I did work experience in a cardiology department of a NHS hospital. Being in the hospital, I saw how different people from other professions interacted with each other to treat a patient. For example, in the catheter cardiac laboratory department, there were doctors, nurses, radiographers and cardiovascular technicians all working for one purpose, the wellbeing of their patients.

By working closely with them, I was able to see how important it is to work well in a team and also how important good communicational skills are. I also the love the thrill of diagnosis because it is the most important part in the treatment of a patient and most of the diagnoses are made by talking to a patient.

In the hospital, I was fortunate to be given the opportunity to talk to a cardiac patient and this not only provided me with priceless communicational skills, but it stressed how important good communication is in gaining the trust of a patient. Working in the NHS showed me that life in the hospital can sometimes be unspectacular and demanding but can also be immensely self-fulfilling.

I also spent a week shadowing my local GP and I was able to observe doctor-patient consultations and also see how my GP diagnosed his patients. Having gained an invaluable insight into the daily routine of a cardiologist and a GP has both consolidated and enhanced my conviction for the profession.

I also work as a volunteer for an organisation known as STAR, which stands for student action for refugees. It is important that students and young people have time, energy and enthusiasm to give to supporting refugees and asylum seekers.

Since I am a refugee myself I know the difficulties an asylum seeker faces and it is a great feeling knowing that I can make a difference to someone's life for the better.

My job mainly involves teaching refugee children at a community centre near Battersea and I am a group leader for year 6 students. This placement has given me the opportunity to enhance my skills as a leader of a group and it is also a rewarding experience as it helped me develop into a more caring and organised person.

In my spare time I play football and it requires determination, organisation and good communicational skills. I also like to read fictional books such as “noughts and Crosses” by Malorie Blackman.

It talks about how important it is to always stand up for something a person believes in and how a society can be changed for the good by fighting for what is right, which is a philosophy I strongly believe in. Becoming a doctor has always been my ambition and being a part of it will be rewarding and a real privilege.

Description: 
I think it is a good personal statement but I pray to god that it is good enough for an interview, inshallah. Pray for me guys and I hope to do the same for guys too :) I have applied to: King's College London (4 Yrs GPEP) Warwick (4 Yrs GPEP) Queen's Mary (4 Yrs GPEP) Queen's Mary (5 Yrs MBBS) My average UKCAT score was 610...hmmm...hoped that it would be better but hey, gotta me greatful for whatever I get right ;) Wish me luck and good luck to you guys, I pray you all get in (amen). Fell free to comment if you would like to :), Bye
Year applied: 
2009
Subject: 
Medicine

Comments

That was a really good

That was a really good statement..wow. Mine is rubbish :/

Mr J

Good introduction but could have been improved a little bit. Your sentences tend to be too long, short ones are much more powerful, remember this.
Things like "hit me like a bullet" ARE NOT GOOD, plus the use of "richest" is debatable here.
Your paragraph on work experience is shallow, I got excited when you said "for example" (a VERY powerful keyword especially during the interview) but your following analysis was weak. You just described what you saw, I can read that in a book if I need to. What I want are YOUR thoughts on this experience.
The "STAR" paragraph was promising as you finally tried to show your thoughts and analysis, however you never linked it to medicine, what a shame.
The conclusion is weak.

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