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Medicine Personal Statement

Driven by a huge appetite for knowledge, a powerful urge to satisfy a continuously growing sense of curiosity, and an incredible desire to help those in need, I was all set to pursue a career in medicine.

Though growing up watching two elder sisters studying and working in the field of medicine, I have come to realise the strict demands and hard work necessary for one to make it as a doctor. The challenge itself is rewarding.

My greatest involvement in the field of medicine was spending time volunteering and helping in the Benghazi Autism Centre. That was only the beginning of my dedicated exercises towards progressing Autism treatment in a city where this mental condition is rarely even known.

Working in the centre, I developed strong adaptive capabilities, anticipating and dealing with the autistic patient, also communication skills with the families were necessary due to popular ignorance to the illness. Moreover, I had another chance to witness the essence of a doctor-patient relationship while I was shadowing the GP at Brampton Health Centre. I also had a firsthand look at some of the administrative aspects of working in a clinic, and realising the importance of managing and organising information correctly.

I continued to be a co-founder of Friends of Autism Group, which aimed solely at spreading awareness and gaining social support for autistic children. I led a team of classmates holding a conference in The School For Gifted Students, which was met with great appreciation from the medical society in Benghazi, as many doctors came to speak and attend. I learned the need to take the initiative, work in a group to meet our mutual goals. My work in the Autism Centre has further encouraged me to volunteer at one of the charity shops of Mind, the mental health charity, when I came to London.

Children's needs and rights has always been a goal for me, being a straight A student in my school, they nominated me to attend a workshop on the International Convention for Children's Rights, which aimed to lay the foundation of children's rights in our country.

During the Libyan revolution, I have volunteered in working as a writer and questionnaire in a free newspaper supporting the revolution in which I have gained skills of being open-minded, working in a group and improve my public speaking. After the Libyan revolution, I attended a summer camp made possible by the Libyan Red Crescent. Quick thinking, detailed analysis of situations and first aid skills were only some of the new things I learned.

We received training by paramedics, doctors, and disaster experts, we also were trained to work under pressure and stay focused in times of disasters and war. I also attended a workshop made possible by The Gifted Students Union, and other organisations, where we attended lectures about The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, by Stephan R. Covey. I learned a lot from the workshop, including prioritising, setting realistic goals, and focused thinking.

I had a unique opportunity offered by the Libyan Government to go and study in the United Kingdom as a reward for my achievement in high school. Medicine is not a new subject to me, having doctors in the family, and attending to the care of my grandfather who suffers from Alzheimer's, I know I can be a great doctor. But coming from a claimed third-world country, I came with a greater goal, a goal that surpasses the fame and success.

I have the goal of spreading good healthcare back home, introducing inalienable rights, promoting medical care. Most students haven't attended bloody revolutions, attending ours, it has left me emotionally invested not only in saving lives, for many were boldly lost, but to make a difference for the better.

Description: 
I wish I put more about myself, my hobbies and stuff I'm good at.
Year applied: 
2016
Subject: 
Medicine

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