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Electronic Engineering Personal Statement

From a very young age, physics has always been a subject close to my heart. Back when I was in primary school it was space that captured my imagination, but as I’ve grown up the world of electronics has become the forerunner for my attention.

It is largely through electronics that the world has developed into something that would have been unrecognisable less than 100 years ago. It is my belief that electronic circuits are the primary reason that the number of patents filed each year has increased dramatically over time, and so to be a part of their development would be an incredibly rewarding situation.

It was at age 7 that I had my first memorable encounter with any form of electronic circuit, when the radio that my Dad had bought me fell from a shelf and broke, exposing the circuitry within. Though I had no idea what any of the components were, they fascinated me. Their discovery led to years of prying the backs off of any devices I could find just so I could stare at the contents, even going so far as to open up a Gameboy I got one birthday before I actually attempted to play any of the games it had come with.

In terms of serious experience with electronic systems, the thing that most inspired me to pursue their study through to higher education was a 6-month series of extra lessons in my first year of sixth form.

The course was largely self-taught, with a tutor on hand to present problems and provide advice where needed. It resulted in producing a robot working on an IC556 pulse generator circuit that could navigate through long corridors and guide itself away from walls and obstacles, as well as an introduction to programming in Visual BASIC.

This project, as well as cementing my position on what to study at university, gave me a huge amount of experience in the kind of work that my course involves, and as such I feel gives me a head-start on getting to grips with the course details.

The main outlet for my passion for electronics has come about as a result of playing the guitar. As stocking up on enough components to be able to carry out projects at home would have been overly expensive, I instead turned to things that I already owned. Key amongst these was a guitar pedal I had been neglecting.

With the use of little else but a screwdriver I completely dismantled the pedal, and then reassembled it again with a neighbour’s soldering iron. To my continued amazement, it still works even now.

Besides these real experiences, I feel that I have a lot of the necessary skills required to succeed in an electronics degree course, most notably logical thinking skills and data management ability. In terms of logical thinking I feel

I have developed my skills in a number of ways, but perhaps the most important was through puzzle-based videogames. Often the problems you are presented seem insurmountable, but by thinking logically about the environment in which it takes place you can usually establish what it is you can do next.

This has also enabled me to develop a great deal of patience, and this is something I noticed was essential when I carried out the electronics course at school. It is often the case that one tiny problem requires a good deal of time spent searching for the solution, and so patience is most definitely a virtue.

Data-management is something I worked on by managing a fantasy football league amongst a few friends, and as such I now feel I am completely comfortable arranging data and transferring it between electronic and paper format.

Overall, I feel that an electronics course would be the best possible way in which I could further my passion into both higher education and a career beyond.

Description: 
I thought this was a pretty cheesy statement really ("close to my heart") but it has gone down a treat with both the staff at school and universities. In fact, I received an offer from all 5. Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield, Birmingham and Glasgow.
Year applied: 
2010
Subject: 
Engineering

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