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Philosophy/Politics/Economics Personal Statement

"The first lesson of economics is scarcity, the first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics" Sowell's words intrigue me as did the thoughts of social theorists such as Nozick and his anarcho-capitalism, Spencer's and Smiles' Social Darwinism, and the legacy of Thatcher. These academics' varying perspectives have aroused my interest on how strict a role the state should play in society.

My earliest memory of politics was in primary school when I was elected chairman of the school council; from there I served three terms of school council in secondary school. In my first year at Stanmore College I became a member of the Student Union and in my second Education Officer/Vice President and Student Governor. From these experiences, I developed a passion for public speaking and politics; this was reflected in my 100% mark in unit two, Governing Modern Britain. Arguments about the need for constitutional reform led me to become a supporter of Unlock Democracy. The models put forth by psephologists and those by electoral engineers have all made me keen to learn more about politics.

Regrettably sleaze, shames and deficits are the perspective of politics today; Gordon Brown was especially concerned with this issue in his "Governance of Britain" Green Paper, he was keen to "reinvigorate democracy", a concept I am keen to promote. I did this through a work experience with Bob Blackman MP and local councilors by canvassing on the street addressing aggrieved constituents on their local issues, and proposing integration with the office of Bob with the college to offer students similar chances. Hence I gained first-hand experience of local politics as well as enhancing my communication skills to a degree of excellence.

As economic impairments stems primarily from the way politics is exercised, obviously the role of the state is of central importance; I wish to explore the various policies from all ideologies could lead to economic development or inertia as I enjoy reading upon histories of civilizations of what made them rise and fall from grace and learning more on a modern basis. I'm especially intrigued by the culture hypothesis and wish to explore the fabric of varying cultures and how it made them where they are today. I am founder of the Young Economists Club and led debates which made me wish to pursue further studies of both Politics and Economics. Despite China's phenomenal growth rate in GDP can its harsh control of civil rights displace the US as the world superpower? Can China's political and economic model be maintained in the long run, or will social irritation and political oppression develop as catalysts of its collapse? In order to learn more about what makes a nation collapse, I have explored beyond the material provided by my A Levels, for example "Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty" by Daron Acemoglu provided me with knowledge of developmental economics and comparative politics alongside Heywood's "Political Ideologies" to further my knowledge of various academics arguments about how society should be run.

Being of Maltese descent, I love learning about its politics, economics and history; in which I did an EPQ into the Knights of Templar period and the pivotal battle of St.Elmo in the Great Siege of Malta. As a skilled orator of the SU and YES I know in order to succeed in defending, attacking or just presenting a point you must be impartial and utilize a logical competence. I have experienced first-hand the political and economic choice that affects everyday society. My role as Student Governor applies to this where I dealt with budget cuts and improving success despite adversity.

Being a determined individual possessing intellectual interest I believe myself to be a potentially successful undergraduate; I hope to gain a thorough understanding of how varying innovations of policies can lead to economic and social progression on both a micro and macro level.

Description: 
"The first lesson of economics is scarcity, the first lesson of politics is to disregard the first lesson of economics" Sowell's words intrigue me as did the thoughts of social theorists such as Nozick and his anarcho-capitalism, Spencer's and Smiles' Social Darwinism, and the legacy of Thatcher. These academics' varying perspectives have aroused my interest on how strict a role the state should play in society...
Year applied: 
2015
Subject: 
Economics
Philosophy
Politics

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