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Physics & Astrophysics Personal Statement

I have always considered Physics to be a captivating area of study, whether it is a question of how aspects of it work, or indeed why they work. As such, I have found deep fascination in studying Physics, as it is able to provide answers (as well as evidence) to such queries. However, as one question is answered, many more are created; this makes Physics an enigmatic branch of study, which I find very appealing.

Having studied Physics at A-Level, along with Mathematics and Chemistry, it soon became clear to me that Physics was my ideal career path, specifically Astrophysics.

I am particularly inquisitive about the physics concerning black holes and nebulae, and the roles played by quantum physics across the universe; I take great interest in how the strangest phenomena of our universe work, finding the fact that particles so small can play such a large role in endless everyday processes extremely remarkable and fascinating.

Mathematics provides logical explanations for many aspects of Physics, while Chemistry involves many concepts which depend entirely on the laws of Physics to be functional (e.g. infrared spectroscopy). I feel that my aptitude for Mathematics in particular has fuelled my interest in physics. At secondary school, I won the Mathematics subject award on several occasions at the annual awards evening.

My interest in Physics was further increased when I visited the Christie Hospital in Manchester with some of my peers, in order to learn about the applications and possibilities that medical physics could offer.

I keep abreast of developments in Physics through the news as well as Physics-related websites. By doing this I am able to be informed about a wide variety of updates in Physics, ranging from lunar eclipses and meteor showers to new developments at CERN in Geneva. I certainly think that the attempted investigation into the universe’s origins is, in itself, a magnificent undertaking.

I enjoy reading a wide variety of literature, which influenced my choice to study A-Level English Language and Literature. During my AS year, I studied Ian McEwan’s The Child In Time, an underlying theme of which is the fluidity and relativity of time; as such, for me, this book encompassed both my fascination with Physics and love for literature.

This subject has further developed my ability of critical analysis, which I feel is a valuable skill particularly in practical physics.

In Year 11, I was appointed as Head Boy, which involved many addresses to my school at events, interactions with other schools in the local area, and heading the student council; essentially, I acted as an ambassador for the school. From this, I was able to consider arguments from different viewpoints critically, as well as working in a team effectively.

Furthermore, I was able to develop my skills in terms of confidence and putting forward ideas/suggestions, through frequent consultation with the school’s senior leadership team. I have also helped out at open evenings both at secondary school and sixth form (where I assisted the Physics department on the latter occasion).

This involved the explanation of several Physics concepts to prospective students, such as the conservation of momentum when discussing Newton’s Cradle.

Aside from my devout fascination with Physics, I enjoy many leisure activities such as drawing and swimming, as well as activities that require logical thinking.

While at university, I would enjoy getting involved in societies and other pursuits. After achieving a degree, I would aspire to work either as an astrophysicist or researcher; this would allow me to share my knowledge on a subject that is becoming increasingly relevant in the modern world. In exchange for the opportunity of higher education, the university would receive a hardworking and committed individual who strives to achieve the best in everything he undertakes.

Year applied: 
2013
Subject: 
Physics

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