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Politics Personal Statement

Politics is built on shifting sands and, for me, this is part of the appeal. Decisions by our government affect everyone, whether they actively participate or not, and this is what has encouraged me to take an active and key role. I feel you cannot complain unless you have tried to make a difference yourself. Therefore, I feel that Politics is an ideal degree course to study to further express my political voice. Whilst studying English Language and Literature at A level, we looked at the power of political speeches, and learned how rhetoric is used by politicians to win favour with the electorate, such as Tony Blair's powerful 'education education education' promise. Psychology taught me how power can be abused when too much is given to one person or governmental body - the expenses scandal for example. This makes it clear why Parliament must have constraints, and MPs must be accountable to the people. Government and Politics has shown me how political processes and spin establish relationships between politicians and the public, and how vital freedom of speech and democracy are as tenants of our country's system.

During secondary school I joined the debate team where we discussed current affairs, learned to support each other as a team, and concisely explain our opinions whilst learning tolerance of those whose opinions differed to our own. I believe this will help me to contribute positively whilst studying Politics at university. More recently, I took peacefully to the streets as part of the student demonstrations, because I believed that the government were forcing young people to take a disproportionate amount of cuts, and increasing the rich/poor divide further. During these demonstrations I witnessed first-hand how politics creates deep conflict between the people and their elected leaders.

I also went to hear Ken Livingstone speak on his 'Tell Ken' campaign to become London Mayor next May. I was able to ask him questions about the riots, and hear his thoughts on the Olympics as well as his fellow politicians. This gave me a rare insight into how Politics works for the representatives, rather than the represented. I am an outgoing person, and keen to learn more about Politics. I have recently signed up to vote in the next general election, as well as to vote for the new London Mayor. Whilst Ken Livingstone was speaking, he mentioned that he believes the reason that governments tend to ignore the views of young people whilst favouring those of older generations is that fewer than 25 percent of 18-24 year olds are registered to vote, whereas 75 percent of over sixties are registered. Therefore governments have little interest in opinions like mine. I believe that we are important, and I want my generation to be the one that forces the government to listen. I have applied to volunteer at the 2012 London Olympics, as I want to be a helpful part of this once in a lifetime event, as well as learning new skills.

I have also raised money for the Children's Society charity, by doing the London Bridges Walk three times. I feel it is vital to try to make an effort to change what you feel is wrong with any situation, rather than dismiss it as impossible. In secondary school I was made a prefect, which involved helping to direct people at open evenings, school productions and presentations after school hours as well as helping our head of year during the school day. Additionally, out of all prefects in my year group, I was chosen as one of ten to be a group leader for a group of year sevens on a 5 day, residential, team-building school trip to Shropshire. Here I had to lead the pupils, explain the activities as well as help with supervision, which helped to develop my leadership skills. I am a determined and single-minded individual who is enthusiastic not only to study Politics, but also to contribute to academic life and to develop a well informed and passionate voice that will make me a valuable asset to my chosen university.

Description: 
Got four offers out of five including East Anglia, Essex, Westminster and Kent.
Year applied: 
2012
Subject: 
Politics

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