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Medicine Personal Statement

A whole team was present, ready and prepared to care for my cousin. Seeing my aunt give birth was an eye opening experience at the age of twelve. It was my first memory of genuinely considering a career in medicine through observing the commitment of doctors, who spend their lives ensuring others are healthy and well.

Last year, I arranged work experience at Kalar General Hospital, Iraq, which gave me insight into a complex medical environment. There were communication barriers as the majority of the staff spoke only Kurdish, yet we managed to interact via a combination of languages and hand gestures.

Due to staff scarcity, I was often asked to administer dorsogluteal injections, obtain ampoules from the storage room and perform ECGs. I would always admit uncertainty to the doctor as I knew my actions could affect other people.

An unconscious woman was brought in who had attempted suicide by overdosing on prescribed pills. As a gastric lavage was performed, she regained consciousness and started panicking. Although anxious, I tried to calm her down by holding her hand and talking to her and her husband as they could only speak Arabic, which is my first language. I realised the positive effects a good bedside manner can have on a patient as they completely rely on doctors’ support during their most fragile states.

During my work experience at a care home, I met a variety of residents with conditions such as autism and epilepsy. I learned how to convey and adapt my communication in an attempt to not offend anyone.

A schizophrenic resident left a memorable impression on me, as he let me into his mind by sharing his stories. He inspired me to read Oliver Sacks’ ‘The Mind’s Eye’, which made me realise we all perceive things differently and have our own version of the world in our heads.

Another world I was exposed to was that of anatomy at the 'Doctors, Dissection and Resurrection Men' exhibition which taught me about the progress in medicine throughout the centuries and encouraged me to become an organ donor. I see it as my way of giving back after I have been taken.

Within school, I have organised fundraising events for Iraqi orphans, which allowed me to experience the joy of filling out paperwork and increased my confidence by talking at assemblies. One of my responsibilities is to run science club where I teach younger students how to investigate and build, working as a team.

This has assisted me to identify and designate roles that appeal to people’s strengths, which has proved helpful during team activities in class. Beyond school, I also help teach primary school children how to read, which has proved that teaching is the best form of learning by refining my ability to describe ideas clearly.

In my free time I enjoy writing poetry and painting, as well as attending humanitarian protests and conferences. I like participating in recreational activities, such as caving and canoeing with my National Citizen Service team.

There were many personality clashes within the team, however we learned to cooperate with one another while working on a presentation raising awareness about the Red Cross and their work in Syria. This experience developed my patience, which I continue to increase by cooking as part of the skills section of my Gold Duke of Edinburgh Award.

My motivation to pursue a career in the art of medicine is based on my love for science and enhanced through my experiences. Knowing about the sacrifice and mental endurance it demands, I am determined to succeed in my chosen profession.

Description: 
I am proud of my personal statement. It got me three interviews and eventually one offer. I am currently doing Medicine at the University of Southampton.
Year applied: 
2014
Subject: 
Medicine

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